What Are Your Salary Expectations Interview Question – BEST SAMPLE ANSWERS

What Are Your Salary Expectations Interview Question – BEST SAMPLE ANSWERS


– So if the question,
what’s your expected salary, comes up in a job interview,
do you know how to answer it? If not, tune in because in this
video you’ll learn four tips to answer that popular interview question so that you can get
the salary you deserve. (light instrumental music) And hey, if you want even more guidance on your next interview,
make sure you take a look at my interview guide cheat sheet where I share five of
the most commonly asked interview questions, and
how you should answer them. I’ll go ahead and link
the cheat sheet below. If we’ve never met
before, I’m Heather Austin from professoraustin.com, and
The Career Club on Facebook. And on this channel, I
teach working professionals just like you how to
build your personal brand so that you can land your dream job and grow in a field you love. So if you’re new to my channel, make sure you hit the
subscribe button down below and the bell notification
so you’re notified when I publish a new video,
or when I go live every week. The expected salary
question is bound to come up in your next interview, and
you’ll be caught off guard unless you’re prepared for it. Now the answer to this
question sounds easy, but it’s actually a little bit more complex than you might think. Interviewers ask this question because they wanna know if they
can really afford you, and how you value your own
skills, talents, and abilities. When you answer this question,
you wanna be really careful that you’re not undervaluing
or overpricing yourself. And ideally, you never
wanna mention salary until later in the process,
preferably your second, third, or even a later interview. Now here’s what Larry
wrote after learning about some of the principles I’m
about to teach you today. Hello Heather, I have good news. I was offered that position
and for substantially more than what I was initially
expecting, $17,000 more. The funny thing is, I didn’t
have to do any negotiating. He goes on to say, I’d like to thank you for creating your YouTube videos, because they are very
informative, helpful, and especially with building my confidence as far as interviewing goes. Now, if you wanna see the
same results as Larry, keep watching. Tip number one is to know your market. Before you can answer
what’s your expected salary, you need to know what
others in your industry and geographical area are earning. For example, someone living
in San Francisco, California is going to command a higher salary than someone living in
Jacksonville, North Carolina. Learn as much as you can ahead of time by doing your research. Now, I have a few recommended websites that I like to use to learn
more about a specific position, and what the expected salary is. The first site is the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, and specifically, the
Occupational Outlook Handbook. The BLS reports statistical
data on things like median pay, the work environment, and the job outlook for a specific position. For example, I could type the term computer programmer into the search bar. This will give me detailed information about this specific position
so that I can get a better idea of what my salary should really be. You could also use resources
like Glassdoor and Indeed. These are very similar to the BLS, however they give you another
perspective on the position. I’ll link all of these resources below. Another thing that will really
help you know your market is to network with others
in similar position. Find out what it looks
like on a daily basis to be in their shoes. What are some of the larger
projects they’re working on? What are some the challenges
they face on a daily basis? This will give you a better
idea of what the job really looks like, and help you
determine your expected salary. And if you’re working with a recruiter, get as much information
as you can from them. And I wanna know from you, in
the comments below this video, tell me if you’ve ever
entered salary negotiations, and if you got the salary
that you were wanting. Let me know, and we’ll continue
the conversation down there. Tip number two is to know your value. To get a better
understanding of what you can offer a company, and what
you might be worth to them, make a list of your
greatest accomplishments. Your greatest accomplishments
should demonstrate your best qualities and what makes you stand out from everyone else. It should also be some
of the larger projects, or some of the biggest
problems that you’ve solved. Think about some of the
things that you’ve done in your previous work experience, or even in your education experience, that make you the most proud. And to really hit it on
the head with this one, make sure you jot down accomplishments that are directly related
to the position that you’re applying for, and accomplishments
that are more recent. And because quantifiable accomplishments are easier to measure,
make sure you list ways where you’ve cut costs,
increased productivity, or used your expertise in
some way to improve processes. Now, I have a few
resources that will really help you pinpoint your
greatest accomplishments. The first is how to write
your accomplishment statements for your resume, and the
second is how to mention your greatest accomplishments
during your interview. Now, I’ll link both of these
resources below for you, and you can watch them as soon
as you’re done with this one. Tip number three is to let the hiring official make the first offer. Do your very best to let the hiring official make the first offer. This will give you more leverage to ask for what it is you really want. If you tell them your expected
salary before they’ve shared what they’re willing to
pay, you risk the chance of either undervaluing
or overpricing yourself. So I’m gonna give you a couple
of responses that you can use if they ask you, what’s
your expected salary, without even knowing what
they’re willing to pay. The first response is, I’m
open to discussing this as we get further in the interview process once I’ve learned more about the position, the company, and who I
will be working with. However, I will consider
any reasonable offer. Another response you could give is, you are in a much better position to know how much I’m
worth to you than I am. I’m open to discussing salary once we get further in the interview process and I have a solid idea of
what the position entails. Now, once you get through
the interview process, and you’ve learned what it
is that you need to know about the company and the position to make an educated statement about what your expected salary is, you
could use this statement. I will consider any reasonable offer. However, based on my skills,
my expertise, and my talents, and based on what I
know about the position and the company, I believe of a salary of, and then list the salary, is competitive. Now, keep in mind that your salary doesn’t need to just
include annual compensation. When you’re negotiating your salary, you can include things like
bonuses, vacation time, maybe even more of a
flexible work schedule. Most hiring officials know
that qualified candidates are enticed by some of these other items inside of a compensation package, so they are definitely willing to enter negotiations with you. The other thing I want you to keep in mind is that the expected salary question is slightly different than
if the interviewer asks you what you’re currently
making in your position. I have another video that goes
into even more detail about how to answer the question,
what are you currently making? So I’ll link that video below, and you can watch that when
you’re done here today. Tip number four, don’t
be afraid to negotiate. Most hiring officials
expect you to negotiate, so don’t be afraid to
jump into negotiations about your salary or compensation package. Some people fear that
negotiating their salary is presumptuous, and will risk
their chance of getting the job. In fact, it’s been reported
that only 29% of job seekers enter salary negotiations, which means 71% leave money on the table
by not even negotiating. Before you answer the what’s
your expected salary question, you need to determine the
lowest number that you’ll take, while at the same time having
your dream number in mind. Keep in mind that these numbers can change as you learn more about the position, and more about the company
and what it entails. And I wanna leave you
with one final bonus tip when it comes to answering
what’s your expected salary. Find a mentor that can help
you work through this process. This could be a coach, someone
you look up to, a teacher, a manager, or a supervisor that you can practice your answer to
this interview question. This will build your confidence, and in the end, help you
get the salary you deserve. And to help you better prepare
for your next interview, take a look at the video I made right here where you’ll learn what
not to say in an interview. And if like you like this video, be sure to hit the thumbs
up button down below, be sure to subscribe to this channel for more videos like this, and I will see you in the next video. (light instrumental music)

7 thoughts on “What Are Your Salary Expectations Interview Question – BEST SAMPLE ANSWERS

  • Have you been asked the expected salary question in an interview before? How did you answer it? Were you prepared? Did you get the salary you wanted? Let me know on the comments below. Let's continue our conversation down there!

  • I entered with this question and I told the interviewer that I would know about the company any my job position and will go through next rounds of interview then we can go through this question.

  • Heather, great minds think alike – I made a video about this last week!! And you're SO RIGHT! Recruiters are asking to make sure they can afford you – it's truly a timesaver, as long as you know what to ask for and how to answer the question 😀

  • Thanks so much for the help! Your videos are so good it makes me grateful to be unemployed and thereby finding you! 👍😁

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