The Real Reason Beyonce Stopped Giving Interviews


Beyoncé dominates the media with every move
she makes, yet she rarely speaks to the press. Considering she’s celebrated as one of the
greatest performers on the planet and is praised by critics and audiences alike, her decision
to shy away from the cameras may seem baffling. In her 2014 documentary, Beyoncé: Life is
but a Dream, the singer explained the frustration she felt over rumors about her personal life,
and stressed that she wanted to share her work, not her privacy. Perhaps her answer to the constant hum of
celebrity life may be just to disappear…only to emerge on her own terms, as she did in
the 2018 September issue of Vogue. Here, we’re exploring all the reasons why
Beyoncé stopped giving interviews. “Power’s not given to you. You have to take it.” Her “Flawless” image The Queen maintains intense control over her
image. And for proof, you only need to look as far
as her 2013 cover story for GQ, in which the author describes the singer’s office as having
a room… “[…] that contains the official Beyoncé
archive, a temperature-controlled digital-storage facility that contains virtually every existing
photograph of her, […] every interview she’s ever done; every video of every show she’s
ever performed; every diary entry she’s ever recorded” Soon after that GQ piece was published, Beyoncé’s
team reportedly requested that BuzzFeed pull “unflattering” photos from her show-stopping
2013 Super Bowl halftime performance. As of 2018, the pics are still available on
the site, and all over the internet. Managing the politics Beyoncé has kept her few interviews pretty
light for a long time, focusing on her music, acting, and occasionally her personal life. “I think people respect that I’m private,
and don’t really ask anymore.” She rarely delved too deep into socio-economic
issues, perhaps because when she did, she was attacked. In August 2015, Salon blasted Bey for not
speaking out on the Black Lives Matter movement, yet it acknowledged her presence at a Trayvon
Martin rally and noted that she and husband Jay-Z were rumored to have donated thousands
of dollars to bail out protesters arrested in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting
of Mike Brown. But when Beyoncé brought the mothers of Trayvon
Martin, Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and Oscar Grant onto the 2016 MTV VMA’s red carpet,
and paid tribute to the Black Lives Matter and Black Panther movements with her 2016
Super Bowl Halftime Show, she was accused of being racist and of “inciting bad behavior”
toward law enforcement. Sharing the spotlight Beyoncé has been in the spotlight since before
she could drive, and sometimes it seems like she’s tired of it. “I always knew who I was and I never felt
the need to follow anyone.” Lately, the superstar seems more keen on sharing
the spotlight with her mother, Tina Knowles-Lawson, and her little sister, Solange Knowles. In a January 2017 Interview magazine piece,
Beyonce interviewed her sister, revealing little to nothing about herself save for a
few childhood memories. In the same month, The New York Times published
a profile on Knowles-Lawson. For the paper, Beyoncé conducted a brief
Q&A over email through her publicist, reflecting on her mother’s art collection. “My mother was the person that preached to
me.” “You really need to live your life and to
open your eyes. You don’t wanna wake up with no memories.” But it’s likely neither of these features
would have made it to print if it wasn’t for Beyoncé’s massive cultural influence. Speaking through her music Beyoncé has been through a lot in recent
years, but she hasn’t spoken about it. Instead, she’s been singing about it. “People see celebrities and they have money
and fame, but I’m a human being, I cry, I get nervous…” With Lemonade, considered by many to be Queen
Bey’s magnum opus, Beyoncé described the alleged turmoil in her marriage to Jay-Z,
including his infidelities. Instead of giving an interview, publicly calling
out “Becky with the good hair,” Beyoncé sings about her in “Sorry,” leaving fans to try
to figure out who the other woman was. In Jay-Z and Beyoncé’s joint album, Everything
is Love, the couple addresses everything from Jay’s cheating, to rumors that he fathered
a love child, assuring the world through their music that for their family, everything is,
indeed, love. Cultivating the mystery Beyoncé is on another level from other stars
in the game. Widely regarded as the greatest performer
of her generation, it seems like other celebrities, including Taylor Swift, are now attempting
to adopt Bey’s press-averse status. As Yale professor Daphne A. Brooks told The
New York Times, “[Beyoncé’s] been able to reach this level
of stardom in which she’s managed, in a way that I really think is unique even among other
black women entertainers, hyper-visibility and inaccessibility simultaneously.” Brooks added that Bey’s absence from the limelight
encourages audiences to face the art first, rather than the artist who makes it. “I feel like right now, people experience
music differently.” Beyoncé told Vogue in 2013, “I don’t feel like I have to please anyone. […] I can do what I want. I can say what I want. I can retire if I want. That’s why I’ve worked hard.” “I will make my best art and just put it out. And that’s why it’s out today.” ​September issue takeover Beyoncé Fall 2018 Vogue cover story was one
of her first in years, and Queen Bey reportedly exercised an unprecedented amount of control. She provided the editorial content, and chose
her own photographer, explaining in the mag, “Until there is a mosaic of perspectives coming
from different ethnicities behind the lens, we will continue to have a narrow approach
and view of what the world actually looks like. That is why I wanted to work with this brilliant
23-year-old photographer Tyler Mitchell.” She then added her personal backstory, revealing, “…When I first started, 21 years ago, I
was told that it was hard for me to get onto covers of magazines because black people did
not sell. Clearly that has been proven a myth. Not only is an African American on the cover
of the most important month for Vogue, this is the first ever Vogue cover shot by an African
American photographer.” Even when it comes to Vogue, Bey gets what
she wants. And it looks like she’s finally revealing
her true essence, and bringing everyone along for the ride. “That was definitely exhilarating. I feel very proud, I’m happy it’s over. I’m an artist and I’m sensitive about my s—-.”

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