Resume Cover Letter Video

Resume Cover Letter Video


Now that you’ve completed the
professional position analysis it’s time to create your application
materials. Some of you may already have a resume but make sure you create or revise your
resume and cover letter to the specific position you’re applying for. Use your analysis and instructor feedback to
help guide what information you want to highlight and emphasize. For your cover
letter be honest but be persuasive. Make sure to present yourself in a
positive light and really show your audience you’re the best candidate for
the job. Choose relevant experiences and do not
be afraid to talk yourself up a little. It’s not bragging. The entire purpose of
this document is to sell yourself to your potential employer and to set
yourself apart. If you don’t have relevant job experiences yet, and sometimes even if you do, talk about
specific college courses that have helped to prepare you for the position. You’ll also want to pay attention to
framing. They key is to be honest while being positive. For example, instead
of saying “I’ve only been in school for two years” say something like, “I’ve finished two years of my degree with a 3.5 GPA. I’ve already taken three courses on
–insert specialty here– where I worked with something, that thing, and some other
thing.” You don’t have much space so only bring about few key points using topic
sentences to help guide your readers. You’ll decide on these key points based on your audience analysis — what are the keywords in the job ad? What does the position
require?– but also based on what makes you unique or desirable. You’ll also want to start with a short
introduction introducing yourself, and a conclusion thanking the hiring committee
or person who will be looking at these materials or considering you for the
position. For your resume, you’ll also want to take audience
expectations into account. This will help you tailor your resume for each specific
position you’re considering. For every position you’ve held, whether it was job
or internship, you should be providing a few bullet
points that explain what your duties were. Each of these bullet points should begin
with an action verb. Try not to recycle action verbs too often. You want to show your reader that you have a variety of skills, and these verbs will help you do that. Make sure you are using active voice
throughout, and that your verb tenses are consistent. Proofread all of your
materials multiple times. Mistakes look sloppy, and might cost you the job. Resumes are an example of a medium in which document design really matters. Companies can receive
hundreds of applications or more and many companies won’t even read your
resume if it doesn’t look professional. For the purposes of this assignment, you
will not be making plain text resume. Instead, make sure your document follows the four principles of good document design: proximity, alignment, repetition, and
contrast. Although you’ll be taking these
principles into account, there’s no one way to design a resume, whether you’re doing it as a
chronological resume or a skills resume. Here are a few examples of ways people
have formatted their resumes. For some businesses, an applicant may approach the resume with more creativity, especially if they want to stand out. We
want to stress that this isn’t always appropriate for the positions you’re
applying for, but there are some interesting elements
you might be able to work into a more traditional resume. For example, including
your professional Twitter handle, or including a QR code you create that links to an online version of your resume, an online portfolio, or LinkedIn profile. A lot of people are also creating
graphics to display their competency in certain skills. Again, this isn’t always appropriate. You want to avoid overusing graphics and don’t overcrowd the document. It can overwhelm the reader. Remember, your resume is meant to get
your potential employees relevant information about yourself. Don’t make it difficult for them to understand or
read. Pay attention to typography as well. Serif fonts like Times New Roman tend to look the most professional, but stay away from things like Comic Sans or brush scripts,
even for your name in the header. Every field has different expectations. Based on what you want to emphasize, you’re going to include different sections and organize
them differently. For some jobs, you’ll put your education section first; for others you want to put your experience.
Decisions like this bring attention to the skills and experiences that make you
the right fit for the job. Use your resume and cover letter to brand and sell yourself. Think critically about what will make you look best. Most of you will
probably want to stick to more traditional resume formats, and for many
fields this is probably the most effective choice, but even when you’re
just dealing with text, there are many ways to create a visually appealing, informative, and easy-to-read resume. Good luck!

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