Résumé Basics

Résumé Basics


Welcome to a video lesson on résumés,
brought to you by UVic’s cooperative education program and career services. Today we’ll learn what a résumé is, what
to include in a resume, and different resume styles. So, what is a résumé? A résumé
is a summary of your relevant experience a tool to promote yourself to an
employer and a way to showcase your knowledge, skills and attributes, or in
other words, your competencies. Most employers spend only 8 to 10 seconds
reading a resume so it needs to be positive, professional and memorable, to
make the most impact. Résumés should be customized to the job posting you’re
responding to. What should you include in your résumé? Required information
includes your contact information– this forms ahead of your résumé and it
includes your name, address, phone and email. You’ll also need your educational
history in reverse chronological order: include the name of your degree or
certificate, the institution, and the year of completion. A list of your work
experiences in reverse chronological order: include the position title, name,
location of the organization and your start and end dates. Your competencies :these
are presented as bulleted statements under the related position in your work
experience. Competencies begin with an action verb that describes your
knowledge, skills and abilities as they relate to the job application. For
example, listened effectively to an average of 40 customers a day to better
understand their needs and successfully implement solutions.
Don’t forget your references–these are 2 to 3 people who know, you usually from a
work or educational setting and who are willing to be contacted by a potential
employer in order to comment on your contributions, personal qualities and
work ethic. Put your references at the end of your résumé.
There are also things that you should not include in your résumé: avoid adding
photos, your birth date, social insurance numbers and your marital status. What are
the different resume styles? These are chronological, functional and
combination. The chronological resume is likely to the format you are most familiar
with; it is organized by date, and list your most recent education work and
volunteer experiences first. Use a style when you have a range of experiences
that relate to the job you’re applying for it. Next we have the functional
resume that is organized by your skills rather than specific experiences. It
includes a competency or relevant skills section. Use this style when you have
little or no recent work history that is relevant to the job you’re applying for.
Finally, we have the combination resume, which uses the best of both the
chronological and functional styles. It combines both recent work experience and
relevant competencies; this is a style most commonly used by students, but make sure
to keep it no more than two pages long. Here are few tips to keep in mind when
you write your résumé. 1. Make sure that is two pages or less of jargon and
complicated language, don’t use fancy fonts and styles, proofread for mistakes
and keep the designs simple. Thanks for watching! Visit uvic.ca/coopandcareer/applyforjobs to explore even more resume resources.

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