Everything is Negotiable

Everything is Negotiable


you
hey all we’re gonna go ahead and get started my name is Lisa Malvin I’m the
program manager for the professional development programs here at the Graham
school so I’m just gonna I’ll be your technical person on here so I’ll just
give you just a little bit of some information just to start you should be
on mute I will control you so your mute in case you want to chat because
sometimes there’s some feedback so I’ll mute you and then if you want to check
you can just go ahead and chat and the group chat if you have questions as we
go through this Emily’s gonna wait till the end to answer questions but if you
have questions I’m gonna collect them and I’ll get them to her as well if you
want to turn off your video I don’t think any of yours are on but you can
turn it off and you just click stop video and then turn it on again if you
want people to see you I’m guessing you probably don’t so I would just leave it
on the stop video um if you have technical problems as we go through this
you can private message me I’ll be here the whole time in case you need anything
and if you have any questions about any certificate program in particular I’ll
be on a little bit after this if you want to ask me any questions I’m also
going to send out a survey at the end of this so we can get some feedback
otherwise I’m gonna kick it over to Emily great thank you so much Lisa hello
everybody it’s great to talk with you over the webinar today titled
everything is negotiable tips for engaging and effective salary
negotiations so I wanted to start with just a brief introduction of myself
currently I’m the director of career development for the financial
mathematics program here at the University of Chicago but for 17 years
before them actually worked in human resources and decided to sort of shift
gears in my career so while in HR I worked in all aspects
including a heavy amount of time in recruiting
which gave me the opportunity to do a lot of salary negotiations with
applicants and so I’ve been lucky enough to use some of that knowledge in
advising our students as they’re considering job offers you know in both
the internship and full-time wolfs so I’m excited to be able to talk with you
all today and I would encourage you to definitely connect with me on LinkedIn
in case you want to continue any of our conversation so before we dive into the
real meat of our webinar today I wanted to take a quick look at some fairly
troubling statistics so this is from a 2016 Glassdoor survey that showed some
interesting trends first of all it showed that 59% of American employees
surveyed accepted the first offer without attempting any negotiations and
there was definitely a gender gap when it came to negotiating the survey found
68 percent of women accepted the salary they were offered without any
negotiating compared to 52 percent of men and older workers were also less
likely to negotiate with 66 percent of workers aged 45 to 54 accepting the
first offer without negotiating compared to 55 percent of those aged 35 to 44 and
60 percent of those aged 18 to 34 and they also found that as age increased so
did the gender gap so 77 percent of women aged 45 to 54 reported they
accepted the first offer and when they did negotiate only 10
percent of employees reported getting more money in their current or recent
job so these statistics may not be all that surprising to you as they seem to
reflect some of the stereotypes and assumptions
that are often made about the process of negotiation but I definitely think it’s
time to change those statistics so strategies for effective salary
negotiation actually begin during the application and interview stages way
before you’ve even received an offer so when you’re preparing for an interview
you’re doing all sorts of homework to learn about the company and about the
job and part of this homework really should also include some initial salary
research you want to be thinking about things like what’s my expected or ideal
salary range especially based on my salary history and any of my individual
circumstances and what is the market data showing what’s the typical salary
range for people who bring similar experience in education to jobs in this
particular City that I’m interviewing at this company or a comparable
organization so the plan is that by doing this homework you’ll be prepared
with an ideal salary range at the interview stage but that you’ll keep
this information in your back pocket the interview stage is typically not the
best place to start talking about salary but you want to be prepared in case you
start to get some of the questions here on this slide you may even get some of
these questions at the application stage you can give yourself a slight edge in
negotiations by not being the first person to throw out a number so there
are ways to answer these questions that can help convince the employer to
actually reveal some numbers first if they are going to reveal information at
this stage so if you get the question what are your salary expect
patience when employers ask this question they’re usually trying to
determine the least amount of money you’d be willing to accept so if you
share a number that’s lower in their range they may think that they don’t
have to actually offer you more to woo you to their position of course
alternatively if your number is too high they may think you’re out of reach so
it’s too early in the process for these decisions to be made so in general you
want to try and deflect whenever you get these questions so a great way to answer
it might be something along the lines of I’m more focused on finding a position
that matches my skills and really interests me I’m confident that your
offer would be competitive or you can try to get some information out of them
at this point saying something along the lines of my salary requirements are
flexible because I’m more focused on the work I’ll be performing and the
opportunities for growth could you share the range that you have in mind or
someone with my background in this position usually using one or a
combination of these types of responses will be enough to deflect and possibly
get valuable information from the employer if however the employer insists
that you share a number that’s where your initial research will come in handy
so by preparing yourself and finding a range that is supported by your research
you can say something along the lines of based on my research the market data
shows a range of between X&Y for someone with my experience in this
role and this would be the range ideally I’d be looking for in this position the
salary history and current salary questions can also be interesting to
navigate and you may see these questions pop up as early as the application stage
so if you’re working through an online application and you have to enter
something within the salary history field usually you can type a word it
doesn’t usually require you to type a number so you could write something like
flexible open to negotiation or even n/a I’ve sometimes seen in systems that
force a number someone just enters the number one in
order to move through the application that’s another way to get around having
to put an exact number in the application and if you’re asked for
salary history or current salary questions during an interview you could
certainly say something like I prefer not to discuss what I’m currently
earning because this position isn’t exactly the same as my current role I’d
like to understand the responsibilities in more detail and then I’m sure we can
agree on an appropriate salary another savvy response could be my current
employer prefers that we don’t discuss compensation outside of the company I’d
like to respect their privacy and I also think it’s worth noting that the old
adage holds true that you shouldn’t be asking about salary during the interview
process while some employers won’t mind at all it can be a real turnoff for
others and there can be an assumption that you’re more focused in you know in
the money and the salary offer as opposed to the job so I don’t
necessarily think it’s worth the risk for you as a candidate to bring up the
salary question yourself as early as the interview stage so how do you go about
conducting research on realistic salary ranges for your desired role so the
first place to start is really by using some of the information that’s available
out there on the web that provides salary data collected in a
couple of different ways so there are sites like indeed and Simply Hired that
will show data for different jobs that they’ve collected from company job
postings on their sites and then there are other websites like last door in
salary comm that will show data that’s been reported by actual employees and/or
HR professionals that are working at those organizations you know fair
disclaimer no site is going to be exact and it’s very likely that you’ll see
some variances between the sites even for the same jobs but they can be a
really useful starting point for gathering some information and data
another good resource is taking a look at whether your specific profession has
any memberships or professional organizations that collect salary data
from professionals working within that field so for example one of my previous
positions was working as the HR director here at the U Chicago library system and
we reported salary data for all of our positions to the American Library
Association and the association of research libraries and both of those
organizations released annual detailed reports for both library job seekers as
well as employers so your particular profession
similar resources that can be very valuable to get a hold of as well and
then don’t forget to talk with people in your network who have some knowledge of
salary ranges for your line of work so these could be people who currently hold
or have recently held similar positions or it might be people who work in HR or
management within the industry and and offer some advice or insight based
on the salaries that they see for positions they might hire for you know
when you are working with your network it’s still frowned upon to ask people
hey what do you make but there are definitely diplomatic ways to ask the
question of you know what would you say is the typical salary range for someone
coming into that position with my background in my experience so all of
these different resources should be part of your research and help you to come up
with an informed data point and so the last thing to mention is to really be
realistic and informed so you don’t want to expect or ask for something that’s
out of line with what you have found through your research out of line with
maybe the level of experience or background that you bring compared to
what the position is asking for or outside of the industry norm so it’s
very similar to when you put your house on the market if you expect a purchase
price that’s nowhere near the comps in your neighborhood then your house is
likely to remain unsold until you get closer to the market norm so when you’re
doing your research there are a few important factors to consider the first
thing to remember is that job titles can sometimes be deceiving so whenever
possible you want to focus on responsibilities when you’re conducting
your research this can help you find a better match so you know sites like
salary comm when you do a search for a job title it’s going to pull up a
variety of different positions that might fall within that title and give
you a description of the responsibilities that fall under that so
it’s better to find a close match to the responsibilities than
title that’s what I mean by that for certain jobs the salary may not be
negotiable so for example if you’re being hired into what I would call a
starting class the offer might be standard for everybody who’s coming in
at that level so this might be when a large company like goldman sachs for
example hires a large number of people into their graduate program or their
their first year analyst you know most of the people coming in at that role or
coming in with a very similar background similar qualifications and so Goldman is
generally going to offer the same salary for that group or for all the people in
that group who have a similar background another factor that you want to consider
is your industry so are you working in for-profit or non for profit are you
working in a government industry or a public sector job you know a
communications director at a nonprofit organization is very likely to have a
different salary range than one doing the same job at a for-profit so that’s
something else to consider in your research and of course government or
public sector jobs may also have limitations in place about how much
negotiation is really possible they may have pay grade restrictions and need to
sort of stick with whatever that particular rate is so understanding your
industry can help you understand where you can negotiate another thing to do
with understanding the industry and the company is knowing whether they’re
profitable and growing and how much so do they have high turnover or is there a
reputation for underpaying employees
sites like Glassdoor can help you to gain some insight into the current
employees view on pay and working conditions so trying to understand a
little bit more about how well the organization is positioned how has their
if they’re for-profit and their public how is their stock been doing you know
that may may help sway things in your favor or may help you get a realistic
picture of how open or able to your negotiations and of course things like
the location of the job the experience and any special position are going to
also influence the compensation so jobs in Chicago are going to pay less than
jobs in New York jobs in Indianapolis are going to pay less than jobs in
Chicago and so on down the road so using websites to calculate an
adjusted cost of living making sure you have a good understanding of what that
cost of living will look like is a very important part in the homework that you
do to come up with a reasonable salary range if you’re gonna have a steep
learning curve in starting the job then you’ll have less room to negotiate a
higher salary but if you have the experience to make a more immediate
contribution or you have specialized skills that are in high demand then you
can often negotiate more and and part of this is really taking a good hard look
at what our skills and experience might be you know I think we all we all know
that we can bring high value to an organization relatively quickly but the
question is do we also bring something that the organization may have a hard
time finding in a lot of qualified candidates and if the answer to that
question is yes that we do bring some really specialized things we definitely
have a lot more control that negotiation process so in general I
follow the motto that it never hurts to ask whether something is negotiable but
what if you get an offer that is much higher than you expected should you
still negotiate and really the decision is ultimately up to you and I think it’s
important to remember that the success of negotiation is often dependent on
your ability to find justification for a higher salary amount so if the offer you
receive initially is aligned with the market and fits within your salary
requirements you might not have that justification to specify a higher amount
now that doesn’t mean that you can’t ask and again it’s all about how you ask and
we’ll talk a little bit more about that in some of the upcoming slides but if
you do get an amazing offer it’s still fine to ask if there is any room for
negotiation if the answer that you get is yes then I think you just want to be
careful to not go too much higher than the initial offer you received if you
don’t have the justification or the market data to back it up if however the
initial offer obviously leaves room for negotiation you should definitely go for
it when I worked in HR and made job offers I usually started with a number
on the lower end of my salary budget for that position because I expected that
the candidate was going to negotiate with me
and of course there were times when I was trying to hire someone who I knew
was going to be on the high end of my budget and in those instances I was
honest with them and told them upfront that I was making my best offer from the
start but most of the time I needed to leave
some wiggle room for that negotiation process so most employers will expect
you to negotiate and so you shouldn’t be afraid to ask the key again is how you
ask and for what you ask so an important thing to do at the point of the offer is
to be extremely gracious even if the offer is lower than you expected it’s so
important that the employer perceives you to be the most professional and
gracious person on the other end of that phone so making sure that you thank the
employer for the offer expressing your happiness and being selected this is
also a great point that if you haven’t received it already to make sure that
you request information about the benefits and other perks like bonuses
that might come with the position because you will want to know your full
package before you start engaging in your negotiation it’s also great to try
to get the offer in writing if it hasn’t already been sent to you you could
certainly ask for it by email but you will sometimes run into employers who
will wait to send you a written offer until after you verbally accept it and
if that’s the case just be sure to review with them your understanding of
the offer that’s being made to you over the phone again thank them for the offer
Express how interested you are in the position and also indicate that you’d
like to take some time to fully consider before you make your final decision and
this is the point where if they haven’t told you already you should ask for a
deadline if they have a deadline for you to respond to the offer employers will
often provide anywhere from 24 hours to 2 weeks for you to make your decision
and depending on the position depending on their timeline so you want to use
that time to consider the benefits and the perks in addition to the salary
research that you’ve done to come up with a reasonable counter even if you
are pushed to make a decision immediately on the phone which sometimes
happens continue to be enthusiastic about the offer but firm about wanting
to take a bit of time to review in those situations you will likely need to get
back to them within 24 hours sometimes a little bit less but the employer really
needs to give you at least a few hours to really absorb the offer and get back
to them many negotiations are going to be done in person or by phone but if
you’ve been communicating with HR or the hiring manager by email you can
certainly negotiate over email as well if you’re negotiating over email pay
extra attention to the tone emails will tend to come off colder then a phone
conversation and so you want to infuse as much pleasant conversation and
openness into your message as possible so that the professionalism and the
enthusiasm that you have is coming through in your email I wanted to share
an example of a failed negotiation that I’ve witnessed so in one of my previous
positions we made an offer to a candidate that did not go well so what
had happened was we sent the offer to the candidate in writing and the
candidate responded by sending an email that included nine different items that
he wanted to negotiate and this list included salary title vacation time job
responsibilities bonus working hours and flow
simple work arrangements it almost felt like anything possible that you could
think to negotiate was on this list and he was he was throwing everything at us
at once the other interesting thing was that in
his response he did not include any men she mentioned of you know being thankful
for the offer or being enthusiastic or excited for the opportunity so basically
this candidate did the opposite of literally every recommended negotiation
tactic no graciousness came across in his letter and it really made us feel
like we had insulted him with our offer and his requests read more like a list
of demands and because he tried to negotiate everything it also came across
to us that he may not be that interested in this position and in all honesty I
don’t know whether or not that was true but the way that he approached it
approached the negotiation very much gave both myself and the hiring manager
that perception that this was not really a job that he wanted the other thing
that came across to us was the perception that this person seemed very
difficult and possibly somebody that we would not want to work with day to day
and the hiring manager ultimately made the decision to rescind the offer based
entirely on this communication experience that we had with the
candidates so in contrast to this example which i think is extremely out
there this is the most extreme example of a failed negotiation that that I
think I’ve seen or even read about but in contrast to that I like you know you
can find a lot of great negotiation scripts online and there’s one that I
found from Rebecca Thurmond at US News & World Report and it’s a really simple
approach but I think simple is sometimes best way to start so so in this script
she’s simply saying I’m really excited to work here and I know that I can bring
a lot of value I appreciate the offer at 85,000 but I was really expecting to be
around ninety three thousand based on my experience and review of the market data
for positions similar to this role in organizations like your own could we
consider a salary of ninety three thousand for this position simple and
and starting with really one negotiation item as opposed to nine or ten in the
failed negotiation now the number that you throw out and in this case it was
ninety three thousand it can be slightly higher than where you’re ultimately
hoping to land because the expectation may be that the employer might meet you
in the middle so again the number you throw out it should be within the range
supported by your research but it can be a little higher than what you ultimately
would like to receive now what happens that you have more than one offer that
can be very helpful in your negotiation tactics and it does present the
opportunity for you to say something like you know I really like this company
and I think I would excel in this position another company I’ve been
interested in has offered me the same position with but with a different
salary would you be open to negotiating a salary that you’ve offered to try and
get close to the offer third word actually the so that’s another possible
to totally use in the negotiation is you know you’ve you’ve made your
counteroffer and you’re going to get a response so
maybe you’re happy with the response and satisfied with the employers response to
your counter and you decide to accept then of course the only step left is to
go out and celebrate your new position if however the employer says that they
cannot offer more salary or they come back with a number that is still lower
than what you were hoping and what’s supported by your research you have a
perfect opportunity to see if any of the additional benefit chable so things like
signing bonuses extra vacation time financial or time off support for
continuing education and flexible work options can also provide some real
monetary value to you and these can be things that potentially an employer can
negotiate with you without having to impact their salary budget or throw
their salary equity their internal equity with other employees out of whack
so these might be great areas to explore so I don’t recommend negotiating an
improvement to every benefit so you again want to be thoughtful and
realistic here so pick one or two of the perks or benefits that are most
important to you and ask whether it’s possible to negotiate changes to those
perks and if the answer is yes then of course you want to be prepared to
propose something reasonable so you know for example if the standard vacation is
is three weeks you know it could be reasonable to ask for an additional
three to five days but it’s probably not reasonable to ask for an additional two
weeks on top of that so just be prepared for a reasonable counter much as you did
for the salary counter another item that might be negotiable is the position
level so for example maybe your experience is enough to push you into a
higher-level role which would allow the employer to offer more salary because
it’s in that higher bracket so this situation might occur again in those
situations where an employer is hiring a class of employees so maybe many new
hires are coming in at a level-one but perhaps your experience is greater and
could be justified at starting at a level two so that’s always something you
could explore as well whatever is agreed upon during this stage of negotiation
needs to be put in writing just like your original offer letter if you
received one everybody needs to be on the same page so it your offer letter
should not just include your salary information but any other aspects that
may have been negotiated during this process so that those changes stay in
place even if the recruiter or your hiring manager leads the organization
and finally you want to know what is your walkaway number so a lot of career
coaches will tell you that you should have three numbers in mind one would be
an ideal number the other would be a satisfactory number and the third would
be a no-go number so the no-go number is the number that you will turn down and
the amount that you are willing to walk away from the position over so again
these numbers should be based on your research and individual circumstances so
I deal in satisfactory numbers are numbers where you would still accept the
position so for some people especially if they’re new graduates or their career
changers and might be needing to start at a lower salary when they make that
career change the value of the experience that the position might offer
may outweigh the no go number especially if you can see greater opportunities in
the future so that’s something to think about when you’re coming up with those
numbers that value of experience for you so so
far we’ve been talking primarily about what you do when you’re negotiating an a
job offer in a new organization but many times we also think about negotiating
with our current employer so everything we’ve covered so far also applies to
this particular situation if you’re hoping to negotiate a pay raise or a
salary for a new role in your organization you’re basically just going
to rinse and repeat the previous slides one of the key things when negotiating
with in your current organization and and particularly pay raises is that
timing can mean everything so while many people will wait until their performance
review that moment could be too late at that point the budget and raise
distribution has likely already been determined so it’s often good advice to
start talking with your manager about two to three months before the annual
review when those budget decisions are still being made again your delivery is
extremely important when you’re having these discussions you want to stay
positive and again you can find a lot of great scripts online for having these
types of discussions there’s one that I found out of Forbes that goes something
like this I really enjoy working here and I find
my projects very challenging in the last year I’ve been feeling that the scope of
my work has expanded quite a bit I believe my roles and responsibilities
and my contributions have increased I’d like to discuss with you the possibility
of reviewing my compensation so again this is a very professional script it’s
very positive you’re acknowledging the fact that you really enjoy your work but
you’re also starting to point out the reasons why you’re looking to explore a
higher pay race so of course you need to be prepared so
your data for your pay raise not only includes the standard salary research
that we talked about earlier but also includes recent performance appraisals
or examples of expanded responsibilities significant projects or work that you’ve
done that has resulted in value for the organization basically your form you’re
creating a justification that should be as data-driven as possible you want to
present your request and documentation in a positive calm rational way and you
may not receive an immediate answer because your supervisor might need to
discuss the request with HR or other company approvers so you know it’s it
may not be typical to leave with the answer to your request immediately and
that’s fine and also be aware that some companies may have stricter policies
regarding compensation so there may be budget constraints and/or policies on
when raises occur and the maximum raises that are allowed so if you do run into
that issue then I think again it’s fair to revert back to some of these other
items of value to negotiate so things like financial support or time off for a
timing some continuing education items you know those are all things that if
you’re not able to get the pay raise you’re looking for due to those policies
you could explore some of those alternatives with your manager as well
if you’re offered a promotion you also have an opportunity to negotiate pay
during that stage so again you want to use market data to your advantage not
just to show justification for the salary you’re requesting but also to
show how much it would cost the company to try and hire someone off the street
so again using a data driven approach can help you end up with more than the
original promotion offer the cost to replace you are going to be higher than
just the salary you know training a new employee and the loss of productivity
while they’re doing so can be an additional cost to the organization again remember to you know consider
negotiating some other perks here as well the flexible work arrangements you
know this would be kind of a telecommuting aspect those are perks
that are usually a little easier to negotiate at the stage when you’ve been
working for an organization for a while because you’ve worked there and they’ve
grown to trust you in your work so this is a great one to also throw in as a
possible area for negotiations it’s important to remember not to make
threats to leave unless you get the pay raise or what you’re looking for in the
negotiation I think it’s important to really preserve the relationship that
you have with your supervisor and while you altima me decide that it’s not the
best decision for you to stay and it’s better to make a move outside of the
company the idea of you leaving should not be presented as a threat or even
kind of an outward bargaining chip it really should be focused on the value
you bring and the data you have found to support what you want to negotiate of
course if you do decide to leave for another position make sure that you bow
out with grace you don’t want to close off an opportunity for them to
potentially come back with another offer so in conclusion here’s the bottom line
your your main takeaways are to make sure that you’ve done your homework and
your research and that you come prepared for negotiation it may not always make
sense to negotiate and that’s where you need to use again your research and your
understanding of the situation to determine if it does make sense but when
it does you not be afraid to ask and that pretty
much everything is usually negotiable so don’t forget about the perks so with
that I think we’ve got a little over 15 minutes for questions so I am happy to
take those do we have any questions Lisa it looks like we do hold on
how does don’t be afraid to ask relate to studies showing that women are
offering penalized for negotiating what if they ask for more and then get to
offer rescinded sure great question so I think the studies around women and
negotiations are really interesting because it is true that there are
studies that show trends about being penalized for asking but there’s also a
lot of studies out there that show women who don’t ask are often also sort of
penalized in the fact that the employer is not really going to go out of their
way to offer any other sort of perks or work with them in kind of offering other
salary or areas for ago she Asian so I think that my my thought on this is that
women should always negotiate when just like men when the data is there to
support what they’re negotiating and by approaching it in the same professional
way that I I think it would be really unlikely that
there would be some some penalizing happening there if it does that’s
probably a real indication that this is not a place that you want to be working
at because if you’re getting penalized at that stage it’s it’s not a good sign
for what’s to come down the road but I really think that there’s a lot of
research out there that supports the fact that women need to negotiate more
more often and need to make sure that they’re prepared in the same way to make
their case if anyone else negotiating now with with offer rescinded that is
not something that’s very common obviously in the example I gave we did
decide to rescind the offer but that decision was because of the extreme way
that the negotiation was handled and so I think that again as long as you’re
maintaining your professionalism and you are strategic in the way that you
negotiate employers are not going to rescind an offer
you’ve come back and asked whether or not there’s some room to negotiate that
would be extremely rare and very surprising another question how do you
handle an interviewer who insists on gathering salary information and
screening phone calls before an actual interview yeah yeah so you know some of
the my first my first advice is to try to use some of those those scripts right
to get around that question and if that’s not working and they are still
insisting on a number then you do want to make sure that you throw out the
number or the range that you’ve identified through that preliminary
homework you’ve done right so what you’ve identified is sort of the range
is supported by market data but also reflective of the reality of what you
would need in order to accept that position so again it’s a range and I
think you can throw that out and you can say things like you know this is sort of
the ideal range I’m looking for but I’d again like to reiterate that I’m very
flexible and open to negotiation how does this range fit into what you know
you are looking to pay for someone in this role so hopefully you can get a
little information out of them as well awesome
and then I’m someone in the chat shared a really good link that they use so that
is helpful too another question is how many interview should take place before
there is any discussion of salary so I’m a little bit old-school in my thinking
about the candidate bringing up the salary question so in in general I
always advise that the salary question should not come up from the candidate
during any of the interview stages that it only comes up after there’s been an
offer extended and you have something to work with now I say that because I think
that there are many companies that can be turned off by candidates who ask for
salary information during the interview process before they’ve made up their
mind about you as a candidate there are definitely going to be times depending
on your situation where you know you’re gonna want to know what the salary is
before you go through the interview process because it may be that it’s a
job that you’re concerned about the salary or maybe you’ve read some things
on Glassdoor or know some things from from people about the fact that it may
be a lower salary than you’d ever be willing to consider if that’s the case
and you know you’re more concerned about sort of that time and energy that’s
going into the interview process that might be a time that you could bring it
up but in general I tend to say avoid it until the opera’s been named how can someone go about negotiating
during the yearly review period after recently receiving a promotion that was
not negotiating because she didn’t ask hmm that’s a great question so again I
think that even if you didn’t ask during the promotion period if you’ve done your
homework and you have found data that supports a higher pay rate for the role
that you’re working it absolutely does not hurt to ask for it and to again you
know have sort of that similar conversation with the manager you know
in advance of the annual review or in advance of whenever your salary budgets
are typically planned out and you know don’t don’t you don’t have to apologize
for not asking for it during the promotion offer but you can simply be
very matter-of-fact about it you can say something along the lines of you know
now that I’ve been working at this higher level for a bit and and can see
the success and the value that I’ve been able to bring at this new role I’d like
to explore a higher raise that can get me more in line with what the market
data is showing for this particular position so you can almost kind of tie
it to the fact that you know you took the promotion and and they had a chance
to see how well you did in that new role and now is a great time to try to get
you more aligned with the data how do you handle the suggestions of a bigger
raise but then after the review you didn’t receive what you wanted so so I’m assuming this is a situation
where you’ve asked for a specific amount they came back with a lower amount than
what you asked for but potentially higher than what a standard raise may be
which would still be good because you’re you’re getting some some increase there
beyond the standard but I think that again if you didn’t get that are raised
that you were looking for the first question I would probably say is to talk
with the manager and find out why is this an issue of you know internal
equity where they couldn’t thump your salary to much higher it would put other
people doing similar work out of line with that is this a question of budget
or are there concerns about performance that impacted the decision not to give
you the raise that you requested so the first thing is to find out why and have
that conversation if the answer is you know one of the first two options budget
or maintaining equity that’s where I think you have the opportunity than to
come back and see if there’s opportunity to agree on some other areas of support
right it could be again not you know there’s a conference that you really
want to attend can you can you have something in place for that you know can
you look at maybe some additional time off or you know is there is there
anything else that kind of you have your eye on
from those perks that maybe make sense sometimes a bonus might be an
alternative as well because it’s not a permanently built-in increase your
salary so it’s not affecting equity that could be an option so I wouldn’t again
come back with all four of those things but I think choosing choosing one of
those to start would be a good way to to see if there’s something else that can
be done so another question is we’ve heard that
negotiating via phone is probably the better way to go
versus negotiating via email what would you say about that I agree only because
again a lot of that tone gets lost in email or it gets misinterpreted an email
so I I think it’s always better to try to do it by phone or in person because
you’re still able to portray kind of that positive body in a body language
you know your your tone is much more manageable when you’re speaking you’re
smiling things like that and it’s much more of a conversation but with that
being said email is more and more the way that communication is done including
negotiation and so I think that it’s fine to use it you just have to or that
your extra mindful of what you’re including in that email and how you’re
saying it and you know even having maybe someone else read it for you after
you’ve written it to make sure that it comes off the way that you intend it to
come off are there any times where you don’t want to put something in writing
so then doing it over the phone would be the better way to go or is there like a
benefit to putting it in writing so that you can reference it in the future yeah
I mean I think that there may be some things that you don’t want to put in
writing I’m trying to think but I mean it may be something like if you’re if
you’re talking about sort of a counteroffer that you have from another
organization but even now you could still put in writing without without
being explicit or details I do think it’s nice to be able to refer back to an
email later with outlining kind of the things that they agreed upon but again
you’re gonna be getting you should be getting a written offer letter that
summarizes all of the the terms that you did agree upon
so I don’t think it’s the end of the world to do either one there’s no wrong
answer to negotiate by phone or by email as long as you are kind of following the
rule of thumb about tone and you’re doing something that you are comfortable
with right I think that’s important too because negotiating can sometimes be for
some people it can be a little nerve-racking a little uncomfortable so
use whatever method is more comfortable for you because that will help you feel
more ease during that process so I know you mentioned not being the first person
to bring up salary but when’s the appropriate time to bring up benefits
hmm so again I think the appropriate time to bring up benefits could be at
the point of the offer but a lot of times companies will have benefit
information on their website so you can start to look at some of that stuff
early if not I think it’s fine to bring it up at the point of offer as
well I kind of group in benefits and perks the same way that I do salary it’s
you know one of those things that doesn’t necessarily reflect your
interest in the position and so usually you want your questions during the
interview to be really focused on the job the company the organization things
like that so I would if you don’t have it yet I’d ask for it at the point of
author great um so I don’t have any other questions well I was planning to
just stay on here for a little bit longer if anybody has questions about
the certificate programs and Emily maybe if you want to stand an extra five
minutes in case anybody has sure other questions but otherwise thank you to
everybody who attended I will be sending out a survey on probably in the next few
hours and then family says it’s okay I can also share the PowerPoint absolutely
but we appreciate it and if you guys have any questions definitely feel free
to reach out thank you

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