Behavioral Interview Questions Answers Guidance 2018 | Interview

Behavioral Interview Questions Answers Guidance 2018 | Interview


How to be successful at any interview situation? Career of each employee starts from a major
step, the Interview. Preparing for interview is of as much importance
as studying for getting a degree. Interview process is stressful for all but
it does not have to be, if you go adequately prepared. Being prepared will help you to communicate
your skills, achievements, motivation, potential and career objectives to the interviewer in
a confident, clear and articulate manner. By this video, we strive to help you in achieving
your full potential. The techniques which you will learn in few
minutes will surely help you in preparing for any sort of interview and distinguish
yourself from others. After learning the techniques you will be
able to demonstrate the qualifications for the position duly supported by facts and examples. Broad Categories of an Interview:
Traditional Interview, which focuses on your resume and most common questions for evaluating
you, e.g., what are your strengths, weaknesses etc. Anybody can easily anticipate traditional
questions and prepare appropriate answers. To your surprise, most companies are shifting
styles of interview from traditional to behavioral because of multiple limitations of traditional
interview technique. YES, second broad and employers’ favorite
category of conducting interviews is ‘Behavioral Interviews’ and we will discuss about Behavioral
Interview techniques in this video. Behavioral interviewing emphasizes “real
life” examples. By providing relevant examples or stories
of what you have done in specific situations in the past, you demonstrate that you possess
specific competencies, motivation or good communication skills that are essential for
success in a given position. The time of an interview may vary from 25
to 60 minutes. From an employer’s point of view, the interview
process can be divided into FIVE phases which will help you in preparing for an interview. Phase I:
Introduction It takes 2 to 3 minutes to introduce you. YouTube is full of guidelines about which
sort of questions may be asked by employer for asking you to introduce yourself and what
could possibly be the answers to this question. We added a useful link in the description
for your assistance. Let’s jump to the second phase. Phase II:
Employer’s Questions This phase continues for about 20 to 35 minutes
where employer evaluates your skills, abilities and other qualities that satisfy the requirements
of the position. Behavioral interview evaluation is based on
the premise that past behavior is the good predictor of future behavior. By evaluating examples of your past behavior,
interviewers determine whether or not you possess the particular qualities necessary
for success on the job. This way, the interviewer does not have to
rely on gut feelings or intuition. Behavioral interviewing tries to determine
whether you have the requisite skills and abilities by asking questions about how you
have handled success, routine and stressful tasks, working on teams, setting priorities
and so on. For example, instead of asking traditional
questions that produce basic, superficial answers like “Do you work well under pressure?”,
the interviewer explores real instances in which you have experienced pressure by saying
something like “Describe for me the most high-pressure situation you have dealt with
in the past six months.” Your response will help the interviewer understand
the pressure you experienced, how you handled it, the result and what you learned. This gives the interviewer a better indication
of your capability to work in a stressful environment. Let’s take another example where behavioral
interview differs from traditional interview, If an interviewer interested in whether you
possess good project management skills, he might ask, “Give me an example of a situation
where you had to prioritize competing deadlines.” A good response to this question might be
one that demonstrates how you delegated work, established priorities and negotiated project
expectations etc. You have to think and examine significant
roles and responsibilities you have held in the past. It will help you to provide interviewers with
examples of situations that illustrate your abilities or personal attributes. For example, if you have been part of a team,
attributes like sensitivity, coaching, teamwork, initiative, consensus-building, good communication
and leadership may have been integral to the team’s success. When you recount specific experiences in enough
detail to highlight some of these attributes, you will be well on your way to a successful
interview. By recalling your own experience, though,
you will have an added advantage in most interviewing situations. Phase III:
Evaluation Third phase is directly linked to your second
phase’s performance in providing adequate answers with real life examples. Based on your performance, the interviewer
concentrates on the competencies and qualities that will satisfy the requirements of the
position. The competencies, qualities or attributes
to which an employer looks for, may include: (i) Technical skills and abilities
(ii) Client Service focus (iii) Leadership
(iv) Flexibility (v) Teamwork
(vi) Motivation and Initiative (vii) Communication skills
(viii) Intellectual competencies This is not an exhaustive list, evaluation
criteria differs from job to job based on the requirements for the position. Phase IV:
Your questions This phase is just as important as your ability
to answer the employer’s questions. Spend at least 4 to 6 minutes asking well-thought-out
questions. It will send an implied message to the employer
that you are prepared and interested in information beyond basic recruiting literature. The most important questions you can ask should
focus on the responsibilities of the position, career path, advancement, and further information
about the organization that will help you evaluate it from the viewpoint of a prospective
employee. A good rule of thumb is to enquire about areas
of real interest to you. Phase V:
Follow-up If you are successful in your interview, you
may be offered the job, or you could be called back for more interviewing. So it is important to be prepared after your
interview is complete. Taking notes immediately will give you a good
start. Include a summary of major points discussed
during the interview and points for follow-up during your decision making process. Wait Wait, here are few other important things
to remember: “Interview should be a two-way dialogue
between you and interviewer and not mere a question answer exercise. Goal of interviewer is to determine your skills,
abilities, and personal attributes and how they relate to the job.” Understanding and preparing for the behavioral
interview will better prepare you for any type of interview. By telling detailed stories as examples, you’ll
become more memorable to the interviewer. You can do it
The best strategy for success in interview includes advance preparation and effective
communication. Prior to the interview, analyze what information
you may need to present about yourself, prepare a clear statement of your career goals, search
and know details about the employer, and understand the qualities the employer is looking for. Being well prepared will impress the interviewer
because it will be evident that you have spent time thinking about how your accomplishments
will help you achieve success in the future. Effective communication is not just simply
responding to one question after another. Recognize how the interviewer’s questions
interrelate, and the importance of supporting your qualifications with facts and examples
about yourself. By following these techniques, you will be
well prepared for all interviews, even the most challenging. Good luck!

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