4 Steps to Prepare for a Job Interview

4 Steps to Prepare for a Job Interview


– This is the most
common discussion I have. I could probably spend literally
all day coaching people on how to prepare for an interview. (gentle upbeat music) You’re prepping for an
interview and let me guess. You’re Googling interview questions. What are the toughest interview questions? Stop now. Here’s the best way to be
prepared for any question that’s a specific behavior-based question. Theresa Nordstrom with
NordstromTalent.com. Something I do with most of my candidates is talk to them about
preparing for an interview. And don’t get me wrong. I do not babysit our
candidates and let them know exactly what they need to do. I really just make sure that they look at their past experiences
and that they’re ready to share results and
experiences that they’ve had to really ensure that
they’re able to articulate those experiences and show
the client what they can do. How do I do that? How do I help them? Here’s the exact process
I share with them, and I’ve done it twice
in the last 24 hours. Let’s see if I can
share it with you today. Number one. The first step is, is
go through your resume, pull up your evaluations if you have ’em, and go through each role
and answer these questions. You can just quickly answer them. What where my three major accomplishments? What were a couple of failures? Yes, you, you might have
failed once or twice. You know, what were a
couple of big challenges. Maybe you had a really tough relationship with a leader or someone. What did you overcome in that role? And what were a couple of big wins? Great. Just jot them down. So you do that for each
role that you’ve had. So it’s not like every little detail. You really have those buckets. The next step is you’re going
to take those top three wins, or that big obstacle for each role, and you’re going to go through each one, and you’re going to really
identify and articulate with a specific format that
we call the STAR technique. I have a link to a tool and to an article that I’ve written in this video below. But otherwise it’s easy. Just go out there and Google it. It’s called STAR. Situation or task, action, and result. Use that. It’s a simple tool that will
really help you think back and look at each situation
that you’ve identified, and quickly have a way
and jog your memory, to have a way to
articulate that experience in a quick format so when you
are in the interview process that situation comes up. One thing I like about
going through and doing this for your entire career
is that, you know what? You’re not using the same
situation in every interview. Because, by the way,
being a former HR leader, they all calibrate at the end. And if you’ve used the same
situation for every interview, you know, or there’s different questions in every interview, we all know it. And it’s kind of like, did that person not have any other experiences? So, that’s number two. So at the end of number
two you probably have, I mean, you may have
easily 15 to 25 examples in ready questions or answers to questions that you can have out there. I encourage you to make
sure you really think about the questions that
you’re nervous about. What are my failures? What are the obstacles that I’ve overcome? Because the two people that I’ve coached in the last 24 hours, one was
a more entry level person, and one was an executive,
we had to circle back on that question, because they skip using the STAR technique. Step three. You have a role that you’re
going to interview for. So take the role requirements. And even better than that, take what the recruiter has talked about. If you’ve interviewed
with the hiring leader, look back, think back to what
the key role requirements are and what you know are important
to that hiring leader. What are your gaps? What are the things that
maybe you’re not 100% on? Think back to what maybe you are missing. Now go back to all those
experiences that you have and figure out, what experiences have you had in the past that translate? And by the way, if you don’t
have experiences, find one. No, no really, there’s
gotta to be something there that maybe doesn’t match 100%, but that you can utilize and
learn from that can match. Know your gaps going in, that’s important. Last but not least, I’ve
been coaching this for years. If my former HR team,
many of my HR team members listen to this, they’ll probably say, “Yes, Theresa told me this.” Keep a running dialogue. This is something that over
time if you keep, you know, when you’re an auditor and
now you’re audit director or controller and you have
three pages or five pages of answers, this process
isn’t that big a deal because you already have many examples. Just start utilizing this and
you’ll quickly have examples that you’ll be able to
utilize in the future. Those are the four steps. What are those four steps? One, go back through your
career, to a certain degree, and really think about
those major accomplishments, opportunities, failures, what you’re really proud of for each role. Then really think about each
experience in those areas that you created and outline
the answer that you would give about the situation, task, the action that you took, and the result. Next, look at the role that
you’re interviewing for. And what are the gaps that you have? What are the gaps that you have
and how do those experiences that you just articulated in
writing, how do they match up? And maybe they’re not 100% a match. But what experiences did you have and how can they translate? Many times I think experiences translate and you just have to help
them figure that out. And last but not least,
keep a running total, right? This is a great opportunity
for you to make sure you look at your past, keep a running log. And so you don’t have
to reinvent this wheel every time you look for a new role. However, I don’t recommend
you looking a ton. Theresa Nordstrom from
NordstromTalent.com. I’m a recruiter, former HR leader. I’d rather say I attract talent. I’m a business partner. And I really help individuals
find roles, leaders, and careers that will
maximize their talent. If you like my style,
please like my YouTube page. Find me on Facebook. I’m sharing a lot of job
descriptions via video now because I think that you are inundated with a whole bunch of words that don’t really share
much about the role. Share this video with others. And help others share their experiences and be prepared to win and get the role that will maximize their talents. Theresa Nordstrom with
NordstromTalent.com.

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