4-Step Interview Preparation for Success: Common Interview Methods

4-Step Interview Preparation for Success: Common Interview Methods


A journey of a thousand miles begins with
a single step. Success is all about ample and thorough preparation
and in this episode we are going to discuss how to do it in your different stages of interviews. Let us first talk about the basics. There are 4 simple steps to prepare for your
upcoming interviews. • Research on your industry, company and
the job requirements • Anticipate Potential Interview Questions
• Get the Content Ready • Practise the Delivery of your interviewing
answers Step 1: Research. Let’s have a quick recap. In an earlier episode we’ve talked about
how to conduct Laser-focus company research. The 8 key areas that you need to research
on about the company before you attend an interview are:
• Annual Reports/Sustainability Reports • Media Centre: Fact Sheets, Press Releases
& Social Media • Corporate Culture/ HR Values
• Business Functions, Subsidiaries, Brands • Recent Achievements/ Expansion
• 5-year plan of development • Industry News/ Government Policies
• Key Competitors & their new initiatives After researching all of these, you would
like to take notes and come up with your insights on a notebook and absorb as many technical
terms and jargons during your research process. This help you quickly taught yourself into
an industry expert in the shortest period of time. On top of the company research, you’ll need
to research on the position and the job requirements further. Identify what skills, experience and personal
character traits that the job requires most; and you have to differentiate between
Must-have skills and good-to-have skills Moreover, I suggest you to look up for
elements that you do not fully understand in the job requirements, and anticipate key challenges that the position holder will be facing and figure out why the position needs those required skills as listed Step 2: Map out all potential questions.
Most job applicants would google “the 50 most common interview questions” and memorise
answers from suggestions online. It’s a no brainer and I believe you would
do as well. It’s a beginner’s step and there are benefits
for doing this, however the online suggestions can only be your reference, because they are
too generalised to help you win an interview. We want to anticipate more accurately on EXACTLY
WHAT TYPE of questions will they asked, so you will need to Digest the Job Advertisement
again, and list out all essential criteria. And pay attention to what I’m going teach
you next. For each must-have criterion that you have
listed out, project 2 potential Interview questions. Question 1: ask directly for you to share a previous example. Sample Question: Please share with me an example
where you have demonstrated your project management skills. Question 2 Ask indirectly or conversely to see
if you are Bad at this criterion. Example: Let’s say you are a ground service staff
of an airline. What would you do if there is a difficult,
irrational customer shouting at you because of a flight delay? [this question tests on
your communication and problem solving skills] Step 3. Once you’ve identified the key interview
questions, we can craft the answers beforehand and get the content ready. Now revisit your Resume and make sure you
familiarise yourself with the bullets you have put on it. Every bullet can be expanded into a full story
to demonstrate your process of learning and achievements, and it’s great to give stories
that relate to your resume so the interviewer can digest the information more easily. I’ll be teaching you a super-organised method
to handle behaviour-based questions using a Career Storybank, and I’ll teach you how
to build your own in a later episode. With this career storybank, you’ll learn
how to categorise what skills the interviewers are testing on a particular question, and
then pick a relevant story to respond. Next, you would need to understand your own
strengths and weaknesses, in particular, how you are compared to other job applicants,
and address them accordingly. So you’ll script your answers to the most
common interview questions to feel more well-prepared, which gives you more confidence when you are
really being asked. Now you have the content ready, let try it
out and see how it works. Step 4: Polish Your Delivery
It’s really important that you rehearse your answers out loud. How we write is very different than how we
speak, so you want to make sure you have delivered the key points while saying it in a natural
and conversational way. Second, the benefits of speaking and listening
to how your answers sound at the same time, engages much more of your brain than thinking
alone. This help with memory retention, so you learn
it more quickly. Third, make it real! Wear what you are going to wear for interviews,
or even try to get a friend to help role-play with you so you can really feel the tension
which happens during a job interview. And fourth, get interview feedbacks outside
the process, like getting Mock Interviews from Career Centres or Mentorship Club. Too many jobseekers waste their real job interviews
as practice sessions. Find someone who has interviewing experience
who will give you honest feedback on first impressions, how you link your experience
to the job on offer and how well you handle tricky questions. Now there could be different methods of interviewing
besides meeting you one-on-one in person. Many companies conduct telephone interviews,
which they called “screening calls”, to conduct the first batch of screening and eliminations. Usually it will be a short one from 15 mins
to 30 mins. Some points to note for you:
Find a quiet place for the interview where you’ll be undisturbed. Write down your key attributes and have these at hand during the call. Have a glass of water available and have a pen and notepad within reach.
Keep your CV, application letter and job description in clear view.
Direct the interviewer to your web portfolio or LinkedIn profile if possible, to demonstrate
your work in practice and let your interviewer have a visual reference point.
Smile, to project a positive image and they can tell the difference in your tone of voice.
Speak slowly and clearly and, it’s OK to take time to collect
your thoughts, and I suggest you to give relatively short answers instead of lengthy and clumsy
sentences Another format that companies are using is
skype or Video interviews. Now technically there are more set up issues
on both sides. If you are camera shy, I’ll suggest
you to practice taking video recordings with the set up you are going to use in an interview
to 1. test the quality of your facilities e.g. Microphone setting, and 2. to make you
feel more natural in front of the camera Now remember to dress the part and make the scene. Make sure you are wearing like you are in
an in-person interview, at least for the upper part of your body. And take care of your hairstyle and makeup. For the room setup, try to get a White background behind you and a quiet room without too many distractions.If you can’t make it in your dormitory,
book a meeting room at your library or other university facilities. I ‘m sure you want to have some reminders
from time to time, so you can stick some post-its around the screen. Don’t look down on your papers as that’s
too obvious. 4.Remember to smile and let your passion
shine through the screen. If you are really nervous, practise a few
more times in front of a camera and you’ll will be fine. Usually first round interviews would be with
the HR person and if you do well, you ‘ll be invited to continue to the next round,
and you will meet with the department head and your direct supervisors or colleagues. Questions will be designed to look for evidence
of: Your value to the organisation; /your fit in the role, the existing team; What separates
you from other candidates; and What you can do for them. so expect the interview to be more specific
and challenging. First, you should reflect on your first interview
and adjust what you did in your performance. Moreover, the first interview gave you many
clues about the company culture and industry development, so you can conduct research in
a much deeper way. Sometimes they asked you what have been asked
in the first round; don’t lose your patience because they haven’t heard your answers
yet! So take it as your second chance to make your
answers even better. And also the interviewer would expect you
to ask them questions so be prepared for asking questions to gain valuable information and
to impress the interviewers with your passion. I’ll explain further in a later episode
on what to ask the employers. Usually in the final round of interviews,
companies like to hold Panel Interviews, which means more than 1 interviewers are meeting
with 1 job candidate. The panel will normally consist of 1 person
from HR, 1 from your department’s management team, and 1 is your peer at work. They are trying to evaluate you from Different
perspectives, but with the same purpose to see if you are a good fit for the role. First, upon being invited, you should find
out from the recruiter about the setting and who will be in the panel beforehand. Then, as in all preparations of interviews,
anticipate what questions will they be asking and get prepared. At the interviews, make sure you make eye
contacts with everyone so they won’t feel being ignored during the process. Look directly at the person asking the question
and begin by answering to them, making eye contact. Then, look at the other panel members as you
finish the rest of your comments, so each person feels included in the conversation. And don’t forget to follow-up with each
one of them with a thank-you note after the interview. If you’ve come this far, you have a high
chance of getting hired, so sometimes little gestures like a thank you note could really
make a difference. I hope the above tips give you a big picture
view on how you are going to structure your interview preparation. And it’s just the beginning, because I’m
going to teach you more practical techniques in the coming episodes. Now a quote to wrap up this one: “One important
key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.” thank you and see you in the next video.

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